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News from the Ecumenical Water Network (EWN)
On the right track: Realising the rights to water and sanitation

On the right track: Realising the rights to water and sanitation

Church-related organizations have contributed to a book on good practices in implementing the rights to water and sanitation that the UN Special Rapporteur on the rights to drinking water and sanitation, Catarina de Albuquerque, has launched at the World Water Forum in Marseille, France. Book: "On the Right Track"

WCC to exhibit Néstor Favre-Mossier’s paintings on “water”

WCC to exhibit Néstor Favre-Mossier’s paintings on “water”

To commemorate World Water Day, the World Council of Churches will be hosting a painting exhibition with the theme Agua (water) by renowned Argentine painter and artist, Néstor Favre-Mossier. His paintings will be displayed at the Ecumenical Centre in Geneva from 19 March in the afternoon to 23 March. More information on the WCC’s Ecumenical Water Network WCC and eco-justice programme How to get to the Ecumenical Centre

Churches support right to water and sanitation at the World Water Forum

Churches support right to water and sanitation at the World Water Forum

More than 40 national and international nongovernmental organizations, including the World Council of Churches, the ACT Alliance, the Christian Council of Lesotho, the Near East Council of Churches The coalition supporting this Call to Action, initiated by WASH United, includes (in alphabetical order):

Youth promise active involvement for environmental justice

Youth promise active involvement for environmental justice

After two weeks of training on the theology and politics of ecological justice in Durban, South Africa, Christian youth from around the world have pledged to start, in their own contexts, initiatives that promote the new understandings they have acquired. Supporting Minorities Preparing for Rio+20 Hope for Dalits Durban outcome is not enough, says WCC Read more about LWF Youth for Eco-Justice

Durban outcome is not enough, says WCC

Durban outcome is not enough, says WCC

In a statement read on 9 December to government members from around the world at the United Nations climate summit in Durban, South Africa, the World Council of Churches (WCC) reaffirmed the need for a fair, ambitious and binding treaty to effectively address climate change effects on vulnerable communities. Interfaith advocacy for climate justice More information on WCC work for eco-justice: Care for creation and climate justice:

Eco-Justice Program Connects Justice and Environment

Eco-Justice Program Connects Justice and Environment

Christian youth learn about 'eco-justice' at climate conference

Christian youth learn about 'eco-justice' at climate conference

Religious voices advocate for climate justice at Durban

Religious voices advocate for climate justice at Durban

“This is the only home we have,” said Archbishop Desmond Tutu referring to the crucial significance of our planet and its survival. He was speaking in an interfaith rally in Durban, urging the United Nations conference on climate change (COP17) to deliver a fair, ambitious and binding treaty to address climate change effectively. Video of the interfaith rally made by participants of the WCC-LWF Youth for Eco-Justice training coinciding with COP17 Message from the Ecumenical Patriarch (pdf) Time for climate justice campaign WCC's work on care for creation and climate justice

WCC calls Durban a “last opportunity” to act responsibly for climate justice

WCC calls Durban a “last opportunity” to act responsibly for climate justice

Considering climate change a “moral and spiritual crisis”, the World Council of Churches (WCC) general secretary, Rev. Dr Olav Fykse Tveit, calls the COP17 United Nations conference on climate change a “last opportunity for the international community to be responsible in addressing climate change” and urges positive outcomes from the event. Full text of the statement Read also: Working for eco-justice is the mission of church Water crisis in Tuvalu WCC programme on climate change and eco-justice

Before Durban climate talks, Brazilian ecumenists think about Rio+20

Before Durban climate talks, Brazilian ecumenists think about Rio+20

While staff of the World Council of Churches (WCC) and sister organizations such as the Lutheran World Federation (LWF) are preparing for the COP17 meeting for the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change in Durban, South Africa next week, the ecumenical community in Brazil is starting to think about 2012 when the UN conference Rio+20 will assess the outcomes of the 1992 UN Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED).

Ecumenical Water Network breaks new ground

Ecumenical Water Network breaks new ground

From Durban in South Africa to Busan in South Korea, water must be high on the agenda of international summits, conferences and church assemblies, according to participants in the Ecumenical Water Network Forum. A sustainable and just availability of water Website of the Ecumenical Water Network: Read also:

Water from rocks: A community project

Water from rocks: A community project

If you thought Moses was the only person to bring forth water from rocks, think again. The people in Mwingi have learned how to harvest and save water in one of the most volatile climates in the arid and semi-arid zones of north eastern Kenya. Through the help of Church World Service East Africa’s “Water for Life” programme, and the Anglican Church of Kenya Diocese of Kitui, several different types of water delivery systems have been implemented.

Solving water problems through traditional and ancestral technology

Solving water problems through traditional and ancestral technology

Wilhelm Pierola Iturralde is the president of the Bolivian Association "Joining Hands for Life", an initiative of the Presbyterian Hunger Programme which works closely with the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) to address water problems in Bolivia. Iturralde was one of the participants at the Global Forum of the Ecumenical Water Network in Kenya, Nairobi. How is your organization involved in working for water and sanitation? What challenges do you face in the work? How are you dealing with these challenges? Why is being part of the network important to you and your organization? Website of the Ecumenical Water Network: http://water.oikoumene.org Read also: Sustainable water projects need ownership Water: a political issue needing political solution Steering for human rights to water

Seeking government partnership for water justice

Seeking government partnership for water justice

Rev. Canon Dr Ezekiel Olusegun Babatunde, a theologian from Immanuel College of Theology and director of the Institute of Church and Society of the Christian Council of Nigeria speaks about the attempts to provide clean and safe drinking water to communities seeking partnership with the government in Nigeria. Can you briefly outline the work you are doing in the area of water and sanitation in your country or elsewhere? Are there any challenges you are facing? How are you solving the challenges? How has EWN been beneficial to your work? Read also: Sustainable water projects need ownership Water: a political issue needing political solution Steering for human rights to water WCC Ecumenical Water Network

Sustainable water projects need ownership

Sustainable water projects need ownership

David Weaver, senior advisor for Global Advocacy at Church World Service in the United States shares about the Mwingi Water for All Project, and how it is attempting to contribute to water justice. He was participating in a Global Forum of the Ecumenical Water Network (EWN) of the World Council of Churches (WCC), which took place from 25-27 October in Nairobi, Kenya. Can you briefly outline the work you are doing in the area of water and sanitation in your country or elsewhere? What would you say are the key lessons from your work on water issues? How is your organization benefiting from being part of the EWN? Read also: Water: a political issue needing political solution Steering for human rights to water WCC Ecumenical Water Network

Steering for human rights to water

Steering for human rights to water

Susan Lea Smith is a water justice activist and an environmental and natural resources law professor at the Willamette University in the United States. She shares her concern over the water crisis and the unjust distribution of water in the world, as well as efforts made to address this issue from a rights based perspective in her country. Can you briefly outline the work you are doing in the area of water and sanitation in your country or elsewhere? What challenges are you are facing in the work for water? How are you overcoming the challenges? How has the EWN helped you in your work? Read also: Water: a political issue needing political solution WCC Ecumenical Water Network WCC member churches in the United States

Water: a political issue needing political solution

Water: a political issue needing political solution

Dr Rommel F. Linatoc reflected on the issues of water and sanitation from an ecumenical perspective in the Philippines, speaking in an interview at the Global Forum of the Ecumenical Water Network. The theme of the forum, which took place from 25-27 October in Nairobi, Kenya, was "Like a tree planted by the water". How is your organization involved in the working for water and sanitation? What challenges are you are facing in the work for water? How are you dealing with those challenges? How has the network helped you in your work? Read also: WCC Ecumenical Water Network WCC member churches in Asia

Water crisis in Tuvalu

Water crisis in Tuvalu

On 28 September, Further information:

Time for Creation 2011: A call to pray, reflect and act

Time for Creation 2011: A call to pray, reflect and act

At a time when the impact of climate change is on the front page of nearly every newspaper, magazine and web page, churches around the world are calling for a renewed commitment towards the environment and ecosystems.

Time for Creation 2011: Trees and forests shall rejoice

Time for Creation 2011: Trees and forests shall rejoice

The World Council of Churches (WCC) has joined in a call to observe Thursday 1 September through Tuesday 4 October 2011 as a time for prayer, reflection and re-dedication regarding care for and just use of God’s gifts in nature. Time for Creation resources Time for Creation on Facebook More information on the WCC and eco-justice: